Neonatal- RN

Neonatal Nurses – an Overview

Neonatal Nurses take care of healthy, premature and ill newborn infants. They may also provide critical care for seriously ill newborns in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU). Nurses who specialize in taking care of seriously sick newborns in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU) are called as NICU RNs. Neonatal Nurses generally work in hospitals, maternity clinics, neonatal intensive care units, etc.

According to Payscale:

  • Neonatal Registered Nurses’ median salary was $58,829
  • Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) Registered Nurses’ median salary was $60,321

What Do Neonatal Nurses Do?

Some of their job responsibilities are listed below:

  • Evaluate, plan and implement infant care with the help of pediatricians and other physicians
  • Watch out for emergencies
  • Report to physicians
  • Provide first aid
  • Manage supplies, medicines and equipment
  • Provide valuable suggestions and involve in policy matters

According to Payscale, 96% of the Neonatal Nurses are females and are highly satisfied in their field.

Neonatal Nursing Specialties

Various levels in neonatal nursing specialties are listed below:

  • Level I – These Neonatal Nurses care for healthy infants.
  • Level II – These Neonatal Nurses take care of premature and moderately sick infants needing constant attention.
  • Level III – These Neonatal Intensive Care Nurses work in intensive care units taking care of seriously sick infants.

How to Become a Neonatal Nurse?

Neonatal Nurses need to complete at least a four-year bachelor’s nursing (BSN) program and become Registered Nurses. Additionally, they can also choose to complete a two-year Advanced Practice Neonatal Nursing (APNN) program.